Herodotus Returns


12,000-year-old Mexico woman’s face reconstructed

This undated photo released on July 23, 2010, ...

The  shroud over the ‘Peopling of the Americas’ is being slowly lifted and more and more it seems like people came over in multiple migrations from broad areas, rather than all at once via the Bering Strait. The latest evidence is a reconstruction of 10,000-12,000-year-old remains of a woman found on the Caribbean coast of Mexico. Hers are some of the oldest remains found anywhere in the Americas.

Anthropologists had long believed humans migrated to the Americas in a relatively short period from a limited area in northeast Asia across a temporary land corridor that opened across the Bering Strait during an ice age.

But government archaeologist Alejandro Terrazas says the picture has become more complicated, because the reconstruction more resembles people from southeastern Asian areas such as Indonesia.

“History isn’t that simple,” Terrazas said. “This indicates that the Americas were populated by several migratory movements, not just one or two waves from northern Asia across the Bering Strait.”

More on the reconstruction.



Link between ancient asian and north american languages

Genetic evidence supports the fact that people – at least during one migration – arrived in the Americas via the Bering land bridge between Siberia and and modern-day Alaska. Now, one researcher is teasing out linguistic evidence. Edward Vajda, of the University of Washington, is revealing connections between the language of the isolated Ket people of central Siberia and about 45 different Native American languages. Here’s an excerpt from an article I found, but I recommend you read the whole article – pretty fascinating stuff.

The importance of studying a disappearing language goes far beyond a personal linguistic interest, Vajda explained.

“It’s a new way to understand human prehistory before there were historians to write it down. Isolated languages like Ket have developed features that are very unusual and interesting, and they help us to understand the human mind and human language ability.”

“We linguists should not be the focus of attention here,” Vajda added. “What is important are the languages and especially the Native communities themselves.”

The rest of the article, here.